SUBSCRIBE NOW SUBSCRIBE NOW SUBSCRIBE NOW SUBSCRIBE NOW
Game & Fish
HUNTING | FISHING | STATE-BY-STATE | SPECIES | MARKETPLACE
 
advertisement
 
You Are Here:  Game & Fish >> Texas >> Hunting >>Turkey Hunting
 
RELATED STORIES
The Turkey/Water Connection
You'll be a better gobbler chaser when you understand the relationship between turkeys and the water sources -- or lack of them -- on the property you hunt. (March 2006) ... [+] Full Article
>> Texas' 2005 Spring Turkey Forecast
>> Portable Blind Tactics For Spring Turkeys
>> 10 Tips For Taking Trophy Longbeards
>> Texas Sportsman Home
 
 
CAMERA CORNER
photo of the week
This Week's Photo:
Look who bagged a 160-pound black bear during a hunt near Kokadjo, Maine, near Moosehead Lake...
[+] Enlarge Photo
 
OUR FAVORITES

The Great Outdoors: A Family Tradition, brought to you by Ford & Cabelas

[+] MORE
>> Win A $2,000 Fishing Trip
>> Share Your Hunting & Fishing Photos
>> Hunting & Fishing Tales
>> Build Your Expedition
 
RELATED HUNTING
North American Whitetail
North American Whitetail
A magazine designed for the serious trophy-deer hunter. [+] See It
>> Petersen's Hunting
>> Petersen's Bowhunting
>> Wildfowl
>> Gun Dog
 
RELATED FISHING
Shallow Water Angler
Shallow Water Angler
The nation's only publication dedicated to inshore fishing, covering waters from Texas to Maine. [+] See It
>> In-Fisherman
>> Florida Sportsman
>> Fly Fisherman
>> Game & Fish
>> Walleye In-sider
 
RELATED SHOOTING
Guns & Ammo
Guns & Ammo
The preeminent firearms magazine: Hunting, shooting, cowboy action, reviews, technical material and more. [+] See It
>> Shooting Times
>> RifleShooter
>> Handguns
>> Shotgun News
Texas Sportsman
Ambushing Texas Toms
Many a Central Texas turkey gets potted when it walks past a hunter waiting for a buck to show up. Is there a better approach? This veteran of many seasons thinks so. (Nov 2006)

According to my hunting diary, we killed several deer on our first morning hunt last year. The notes I made about them indicate that they were just mediocre animals; an early hunt and itchy trigger fingers lay behind most of their deaths.

The real headliner on that first morning was the tom turkey that was brought in. We all gathered around the bird and its lucky assassin, watching carefully as the gobbler was dressed out. A nice, fat, long-bearded fellow, the turkey turned out to have breakfasted mostly on very common Hill Country stuff: acorns, corn, some milo, a few blades of grass or weeds, and something disgusting that might have been a lizard. But, we also learned, its stomach contents gave evidence of an early-morning visit to at least one deer feeder -- the only place from which it could have eaten milo and corn.

"Big deal!" you might say. "All toms eat milo and corn when they can get it."


continue article
 
 

"Well yeah," I'd reply. But since the bird had been on the move for only about 30 minutes when it bought its ticket to that great turkey roost in the sky -- the hunter shot it at 7 a.m. -- we figured that its route took it pretty much in a turkey's version of a straight line from roost to feeder. Which meant that it and its buddies knew where the deer feeders were. Gillespie County had been pretty dry in August, September and October of last year, and it looked as if the birds' normal diet of seeds, small bugs and acorns had already begun to fail.

In a way, this was good news. On our lease, we shoot deer, but we hunt turkeys. It's pretty much a given that if you sit still in the woods in the Hill Country, you'll see deer wandering around -- but if you have bad intentions toward Tom Turkey, you need to know where to sit. We like to call it "ambushing."

Once you're in a deer blind, it doesn't matter much what you wear or how much you wiggle around -- you're in a big box, and the deer can't see you! But to situate yourself where the turkeys will give you a shot calls for different measures indeed. That's why it's more fun to hunt the big bird: You get to (heck -- you have to) wear camouflage, and you have to put your best Rambo don't-move-or-you-die mentality in gear.

All our lease hunters believe four basic Tom Turkey "facts" -- and all would-be turkey ambushers need to fix them firmly in their minds.

Fact No. 1: The gobbler is the classic overachiever. A bird with a body the size of a large beach ball and a brain roughly the size of a lima bean: How smart can it be? Not very. Nevertheless, in the battle of wits between turkey and hunter, the feathered contestant comes out ahead of the big-brained human in most encounters. How does it manage that, given its brain power, or lack thereof?

Well, as my wife says frequently, "All the dumb ain't on his side." And she may have a point. It can't take too much smarts to outmaneuver a man who'll spend $75 a pound for red meat when he can buy it at the local HEB store for $2.98.


page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5
 
QUICK NAVIGATION
 
OUTDOOR OFFERS
FISHING:
Rods & Reels
Tackle & Accessories
Clothing & Outerwear
HUNTING:
Optics & Scopes
GPS & Electronics
Clothing & Outerwear
Gear & Accessories
Bows & Arrows
 


 
OUR NETWORK: OUTDOOR'S BEST WEBSITES
[Featured Title]
Shallow Water Angler  
Shallow Water Angler
The nation's only publication devoted to inshore fishing, covering waters from Texas to Maine.
 *See the Site
*Subscribe to the magazine
[Features From Shallow Water Angler]
>> Complete the Illusion
>> Make It a Mondo Mullet
>> Solitude & Shallows - Chandeleur Island
>> South Carolina Creates Second Inshore Reef
* Subscribe to the Shallow Water Angler
[All Titles]
 >> CONTACT>> ADVERTISE>> MEDIA KIT>> SUBSCRIBER SERVICES>> GIVE A GIFT